• I was born on Long Island, N.Y., where I lived for twelve years until my parents decided the country was the place they wanted to be, so they loaded up the Ford and we moved north to the metropolis of Lake Luzerne.  After high school, I attended Oswego State University.  Go, Great Lakers!
     
    I taught for a year at St. Mary's Academy in Rensselaer, NY and then escaped the weather and moved south in 1993.  Fortunately, I was hired here at Central Cabarrus High School.  After twenty years, I consider this more than a school; it's a second home. 
     
    When I'm not teaching English and cracking corny jokes, I spend time with my family, drive to my sons' numerous activities, search out new music online, play way too much fantasy sports, and attempt to get my 48 year-old self into shape.
     
    In addition to teaching, I work to help facilitate Central's Beacons, a group of 125+ upperclassmen leaders who act as mentors for incoming freshmen.   
     
    I look forward to meeting all of you and beginning another great year here at Central Cabarrus High School, but you better get used to me talking about my favorite teams: the New York Yankees, the Carolina Panthers, the Carolina Hurricanes, and my graduate alma mater, the Charlotte 49rs!
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                                                         CONTACT INFO
     
                                                              keith.maletta@cabarrus.k12.nc.us
     
                                                                       704-260-6570 ext 40512
  •                                                                                SCHEDULE
     
                                                                     SCHEDULE
     
                                                                                   1st: PLANNING
                                                                                   2nd: ENGLISH III
                                                                                   3rd: STEM ENGLISH I
                                                                                   4th: STEM ENGLISH I
  •  

    STEM Honors English I

     

    Here are the guts of the class, what lies under the hood.  What follows are specifics about how this class differs from a general level class and how this class differs from a typical honors level class.

     

    Curriculum Content

     

    STEM education is about exploration and independence from textbooks and monotony.  Though students will complete all English I assignments and assessments to master the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts for grade 9, because STEM education mirrors the real world, this class reflects the role 21st century learners have in an ever-changing, increasingly tech-driven world.  STEM English I forces students away from facts and recall, away from teacher-dependence, and into a world where they create, collaborate, and take ownership of the skills needed to read, write, speak, effectively in our tech-heavy society.

     

    Independence is stressed throughout the course.  Aside from Romeo and Juliet and The Odyssey, students approach reading independently, focusing on and analyzing authors and books they want to read.  Research has shown that independent reading is the best way to foster a lifelong love of reading and a deeper understanding of what is read.   Writing is stressed through the study of sentence structures, sentence combining, and blog work.  Focusing on core STEM principals of design, all pieces are constantly put through numerous peer edits and teacher edits until they are worthy of publication on our public blog. 

     

    This course interconnects with other core area STEM subjects and continually seeks opportunities for cross-pollination in interdisciplinary P.B.L.’s.  This interdependence fosters a deeper understanding of concepts because subject content learned in a student’s science class is reiterated in her other classes.  Subject areas join forces to meet subject area content, weaving understanding with real-world practicality, tightening understanding. 

     

     

     

    Standards and Objectives

    While the course is designed to meet the standards set forth in the curriculum documents and to analyze literature in a way to prepare students for the types of analysis they will do in upper level English courses, we go far beyond those standards.  The goals are to create independent readers, writers, thinkers, and speakers, students who will thrive in the collaborative, synergistic environment of a 21st century workspace.

     

    All honors level English classes require students to become adept at close reading/understanding of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.  Students practice such close reading skills throughout the class in both individualized and collaborative settings, creating a solid foundation for the kinds of analysis done in the upper level classes. 

     

     

    Curriculum Plan

    The class syllabus can be accessed from the class CANVAS page under the “Beginning of Year” module.  In the document, you will find an Excel spreadsheet that shows the units covered, the due dates of major projects, readings covered inside and outside of class, the grammar/punctuation activities, STEM Lab due dates, and the pacing of each unit.

     

    You can also click in the same space to access my classroom newsletter that highlights the many units and skills taught.

     

    To access the Parent Curriculum Documents, please follow the link below.

    https://www.cabarrus.k12.nc.us/Page/33225

     

     

    Instructional Materials and Methods

    This class is taught in a way that moves the teacher from the “sage on the stage” to the “guide on the side”.  Students will complete the following tasks:

     

    ·      Research is rooted in inquiry learning through STEM LABs and is completed every week.  Students learn the entire research method in great depth by completing mini-research “papers” every week. 

    ·      Writing is done through the classroom blog, which involves a minimum of three peer edits and as many master edits as needed before publication in our public blog. 

    ·      Based on the practices of Nancy Atwell, Kelly Gallagher, and others, students are urged to lose themselves in literature, to build their reading endurance, and to connect with the themes, characters, and conflicts that make reading literature such a rich experience.   At 150 minutes/week, students will average about 700K words read this semester, which is in-line with the quantity needed to be college ready

    ·      Students are also required to post weekly about their reading using the “reading signposts” pioneered by Kylene Beers and Robert Probst.  Their approach to rigor is illustrated in the following quote: “[r]igor does not lie in the barbell but in the act of lifting it, rigor in reading is not an attribute of the text but…in the reader’s behavior- engaged, observant, responsive, analytical”.  These are the skills that the signposts teach.

    ·      The need to balance the county curriculum plan and the requirements of a STEM class is done through constant thematic linking and discussion.

    ·      After attending STEMMERSION, a summer institute connecting STEM teachers with business leaders in their business settings, it was clear that the ability to communicate is paramount to success, so students are constantly required to present in front of their partners, groups, and class.

    ·      Analysis of all types of writing is done on a weekly basis through a series of “bell ringer” activities, culminating in a Friday discussion.

    ·      Major P.B.L.’s are how we tie together larger readings, the themes of the curriculum map, and real-world tethered projects. 

    ·      Our units are front-loaded, meaning the plan is in place before the students enter, and I assist them along the way, often admiring how they adapt to the requirements and create their own ways of tackling the problems at hand.

     

     

    Additional Resources:

    SOAPStone

    TP-CASTT

    Kelly Gallagher

    Nancie Atwell

    Signposts in an AP class

     

     

    Assessment

    Students are assessed on their understanding through homework assignments, quizzes, and benchmarks.  Projects, products, and presentations are assessed using the common STEM department rubrics.  After major P.B.L.’s students are also asked to assess their own learning, effort, and collaborative skills in self-reflections.  Taken as a whole from their groups, their grade IS affected by the evaluations they give themselves as well as what their group members write about them.  This 360 degree evaluation system forces accountability at all phases of major projects, a crucial link to the real world where co-workers are continually asked to evaluate members of their teams as part of major projects.   

     

    At the end of the semester, all English I students will take the NCFE for English I. This exam will not include any Honors extensions and will count for 25% of their final course average.

     

     

    Additional Resources:

    Stem Rubrics

     
     
     
  • STEM Honors English III

     

    Here are the guts of the class: what lies under the hood.  What follows are specifics about how this class differs from a general level class and how this class differs from a typical honors level class.

     

     

    Curriculum Content

     

    STEM education is about exploration and independence from textbooks and monotony.  Though students will complete all English III assignments and assessments to master the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts for grade 11, because STEM education mirrors the real world, this class reflects the role 21st century learners have in an ever-changing, increasingly tech-driven world.  STEM English III forces students further from facts and recall and into a world they will soon inhabit, where they create, collaborate, and take ownership of the skills needed to read, write, and speak effectively in our tech-heavy society.

     

    Independence is stressed throughout the course.  Aside from Moby Dick, Othello, and two required novels, students approach reading independently, focusing on and analyzing authors and books they want to read.  Research has shown that independent reading is the best way to foster a lifelong love of reading, a stronger vocabulary, and a deeper understanding of what is read.   Writing is stressed through the study of sentence structures, sentence combining, and blog work.  Focusing on core STEM principals of design, all pieces are constantly put through numerous peer edits and teacher edits until they are worthy of publication on our public blog.   

     

    This course interconnects with other core area STEM subjects and continually seeks opportunities for cross-pollination in interdisciplinary P.B.L.’s.  This interdependence fosters a deeper understanding of concepts because subject content learned in a student’s science class is reiterated in her other classes.  Subject areas join forces to meet subject area content, weaving understanding with real-world practicality, tightening understanding. 

     

     

     

    Standards and Objectives 

    While the course is designed to meet the standards set forth in the curriculum documents and to analyze literature in a way to prepare students for the types of analysis they will do in upper level English/A.P. courses, we go far beyond those standards.  The goals are to create independent readers, writers, thinkers, and speakers, students who will thrive in the collaborative, synergistic environment of a 21st century workspace.

     

    All honors level English classes require students to become adept at close reading/understanding of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.  Students practice such close reading skills throughout the class in both individualized and collaborative settings, building upon the skills learned in previous classes.

     

     

    Curriculum Plan

    The class syllabus can be accessed from the class CANVAS page under the “Beginning of Year” module.  In the document, you will find an Excel spreadsheet that shows the units covered, the due dates of major projects, readings covered inside and outside of class, the grammar/punctuation activities, STEM Lab due dates, and the pacing of each unit.

     

    You can also click in the same space to access my classroom newsletter that highlights the many units and skills taught.

     

    To access the Parent Curriculum Documents, please follow the link below.

    https://www.cabarrus.k12.nc.us/Page/33225

     

     

    Instructional Materials and Methods

    This class is taught in a way that moves the teacher from the “sage on the stage” to the “guide on the side”.  Students will complete the following tasks:

     

    ·      Research is rooted in inquiry learning through STEM LABs and is completed every week.  Students learn the entire research method in greater depth by completing mini-research papers every week. 

    ·      Our research project is rooted in the real world with students researching the history of Central Cabarrus, contacting the people who have called it home, designing an online, permanent resource for digital resources they’ve created, and a durable plaque honoring their bit of history.

    ·      Writing is done through the publicly viewable classroom blog.  Using class time and time at home, students compose STEM-related articles, which are peer and teacher edited as many times as needed before publication in our public blog. 

    ·      Based on the practices of Nancy Atwell, Kelly Gallagher, and others, students are urged to lose themselves in literature, to build their reading endurance, and to connect with the themes, characters, and conflicts that make reading literature such a rich experience.   At 190 minutes/week, students will average about 900K words read this semester, which is in-line with the quantity needed to be college ready.

    ·      Students are also required to post weekly about their reading using the “reading signposts” pioneered by Kylene Beers and Robert Probst.  Their approach to rigor is illustrated in the following quote: “[r]igor does not lie in the barbell but in the act of lifting it, rigor in reading is not an attribute of the text but…in the reader’s behavior- engaged, observant, responsive, analytical”.   These are skills the signposts teach. 

    ·      The need to balance the county curriculum plan and the requirements of a STEM class is done through constant thematic linking and discussion.

    ·      After attending STEMMERSION, a summer institute connecting STEM teachers with business leaders in their business settings, it was clear that the ability to communicate is paramount to success, so students are constantly required to present in front of their partners, groups, and class.

    ·      Analysis of all types of writing is done on a weekly basis through a series of “bell ringer” activities, culminating in a Friday discussion.

    ·      Major P.B.L.’s are how we tie together larger readings, the themes of the curriculum map, and real-world tethered projects. 

    ·      Our units are front-loaded, meaning the plan is in place before the students enter, and I assist them along the way, often admiring how they adapt to the requirements and create their own ways of tackling the problems at hand.

     

     

    Additional Resources:

    SOAPStone

    TP-CASTT

    Kelly Gallagher

    Nancie Atwell

    Signposts in an AP class

     

     

     

    Assessment

    Students are assessed on their understanding through homework assignments, quizzes, and benchmarks.  Projects, products, and presentations are assessed using the common STEM department rubrics.  After major P.B.L.’s students are also asked to assess their own learning, effort, and collaborative skills in self-reflections.  Taken as a whole from their groups, their grade IS affected by the evaluations they give themselves as well as what their group members write about them.  This 360 degree evaluation system forces accountability at all phases of major projects, a crucial link to the real world where co-workers are continually asked to evaluate members of their teams as part of major projects.   

     

    At the end of the semester, all English I students will take the NCFE for English III. This exam will not include any Honors extensions and will count for 25% of their final course average.

     

     

    Additional Resources:

    Stem Rubrics

Last Modified on Sunday at 12:10 PM