English I

  • English I or English I Honors is required of all freshmen.
     
    English I reinforces basic reading, grammar, composition, and study skills. Nonfiction and informational texts, as well as a variety of literary genres, will be carefully read and analyzed. Students will analyze texts for themes, central ideas, diction and character development by referring directly to the text. Both print and non-print sources will be used during student analysis. Students will learn to write in the argumentative, informative/explanatory, and narrative writing modes. Students will conduct research; practice the complete writing process of planning, revising, and editing and use technology to share writing. Students also will participate in collaborative discussions, organize and prepare information, and use digital media for research. The final exam for this course is a common exam that will be given to all English I students.
     
    English I Honors (weighted) builds upon the regular English I curriculum with more in-depth analysis and discussion. It starts the student on a sequentially developed/advanced program that is designed to challenge students in areas of grammar, composition, and literature. In addition to a research paper, honors students will write a literary analysis paper. Students will be expected to read independently in order to facilitate class discussion. The final exam for this course is a common exam that will be given to all English I students. Suggested prerequisite: A in 8th grade Language Arts, or B in AIG.

English II

  • English II focuses on the study of world literature and its connections to key U.S. documents. Students read and study literature and various genres of printed materials in order to respond to literature through writing. Writing instruction emphasizes the research process and paper while also preparing students for the state End of Course Exam which tests reading, writing, and analytical skills as outlined below.
    Length of course: 1 semester
     
    Honors English II (weighted) focuses on in-depth analysis of significant works of world literature and its connections to key U.S. documents. Special emphasis is given to vocabulary study in preparation for reading, writing, and SAT testing. Higher level thinking skills are introduced in the study of composition and literature. Writing instruction emphasizes the research process and paper while also preparing students for the state End of Course Exam which tests reading, writing, and analytical skills as outlined below. Additionally, an honors paper is required in Honors English II.
    Suggested prerequisite: B in Honors English I or A in English I Length of course: 1 semester
     
    Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts: Grade 10
    Reading Standards for Literature and Informational Texts
    •Analyze a text for themes, central ideas, and character development by referring directly to the text.
    •Analyze and evaluate author's choices concerning vocabulary, structure, and purpose.
    •Analyze cultural ideas and points of view in a work of literature from outside of the United States.
    • Integrate and analyze ideas from literature and other medium (i.e. compare and contrast print and non-print pieces)
    • Evaluate argumentative claims in a text.
    •Analyze U.S. documents related to themes and concepts.
     

    Writing Goals & Types of Writing
    Writing activities in English I and II will focus on the following goals:
    •Through understanding of task, purpose, and audience, students will produce clear and organized pieces of writing.
    •Students will practice the writing process of planning, revising, and editing.
    •Students will use technology to share their writing.
    •Students will conduct research in English I and II by following the MLA guidelines.
    Types of writing:
    •Argumentative: Make and support claims about topics or texts.
    •Informative/explanatory: Carefully examine complex ideas and concepts in a clear and organized manner.
    •Narrative: Tell a personal or fictional story.
    Speaking & Listening
    •Participate in collaborative discussions.
    •Organize and prepare formal presentations.
    •Use digital media to enhance presentations.
     

    Language Standards
    •Demonstrate understanding of standard English grammar when writing and speaking.
    o By the end of English II, students will be able to use parallel structure, phrase and clause variety, semicolons, and colons.
    •Advance vocabulary through use of context clues, word parts, and reference materials.
    Use vocabulary related to the study of English.

English III

  • AP English III
    Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Course #10237SB0 (weighted) is an advanced placement course designed for the serious student with strong analytical skills in reading, reading comprehension, and writing. This course emphasizes non-fiction and writing skills as recommended by the College Board curriculum. Extensive reading and writing are required. Furthermore, strong skills in both grammar and language are necessary. Students may receive college credit based on an acceptable score on the AP English examination. This course will also help prepare students for SAT exams and writing for the college application process. An additional focus includes American literary classics.
    Prerequisite: B in English II Honors or recommendation from previous year English teacher
    Eligibility: Grade 11 Credit: One unit; 2 QP (Year-long course counts toward graduation as the required English III course)

English IV

  • English IV
    English IV is a study of British literature. Students will study a range of British poetry, Shakespeare, fiction, satire, and nonfiction selections coupled with key U.S. documents. CMHS English IV students write a 5-7 page literary analysis research paper on a text from British literature. Unit themes include "Madness, Mayhem, and Malevolence," "Conforming the Chaos: The Struggle of an Individual in Social Order," " Matters of the Heart," and "Leaving a Legacy."

    At the end of the semester, students will compile a portfolio of work that includes narrative, informative, literary analysis, and topic synthesis assignments. At least one of these assignments will be submitted electronically. Overall, English IV aims to refine student's abilities to analyze language, literature, media, and speaking and listening. As seniors, students should work effectively, independently, and collaboratively to grapple with language and meaning in texts. They should also successfully write for a variety of purposes and audiences.
     

    Honors English IV
    Honors English IV is a study of British literature. Students will study a range of British poetry, Shakespeare, fiction, satire, and nonfiction selections coupled with key U.S. documents. CMHS English IV students write a 5-7 page literary analysis research paper on a text from British literature. Unit themes include "Madness, Mayhem, and Malevolence," "Conforming the Chaos: The Struggle of an Individual in Social Order," " Matters of the Heart," and "Leaving a Legacy."

    At the end of the semester, students will compile a portfolio of work that includes narrative, informative, literary analysis, and topic synthesis assignments. At least one of these assignments will be submitted electronically. Overall, English IV aims to refine student's abilities to analyze language, literature, media, and speaking and listening. As seniors, students should work effectively, independently, and collaboratively to grapple with language and meaning in texts. They should also successfully write for a variety of purposes and audiences.

    In addition to the English IV requirements above, Honors English IV aims to prepare students for college-level literary analysis, research, and presentation skills. Students write a 3-5 page argumentative Honors Paper. Honors students should be able to read, write, and speak intelligently to support interpretations and arguments about concrete and abstract principles at work in literature and life.
     
    AP English IV
    The Advanced Placement Literature and Composition course will introduce students to a study of literature focusing on fiction, drama, and poetry. Throughout this course, students will critically analyze the structure, style, and themes of the reading selections. Alongside the study of literature, students will refine their skills as writers. Students will focus on expressing themselves effectively and fluently in order to develop a mature writing style. The AP Examination will assess mastery of these skills.

Broadcasting

  • Broadcasting I is a course in which students learn the basics of planning, filming, editing, and broadcasting. Using basic production software, students will learn the essential tasks required to complete a quality video including voiceovers, video and audio adjustments, and titles. Not only do we have MacBook Pros for this class, but we have high-definition cameras that we will be using to broadcast to create superior videos. Using specially-designed programs for editing and streaming, students will be able to show their creativity and share their voices with the school. All students willing to work creatively and cooperatively with others are welcome to take the course.
     
    Broadcasting II is a course in which students will continue to build on their understanding of planning, filming, editing, and broadcasting. Maximizing the use of production software, iMovie (and maybe get a glimpse into Final Cut Pro), students will learn the essential tasks required to master the production of a quality video. While reviewing how to include voiceovers, video and audio adjustments, and titles effectively, we will also learn how to use picture-in-picture, green-screens, and other features that improve the final product. In addition, students will review numerous broadcasting styles, research famous broadcasters, all while immersing themselves within the school and community to create a broadcast that is inspired and original. Students should expect to stay after to complete some of their long-term, independent assignments. Students are required to fill out an application and two teacher recommendations in order to be considered for the course.


    Broadcasting III is a course in which students will continue to build on their understanding of planning, filming, editing, and broadcasting. By introducing the use of production software, Final Cut Pro (FCP), students will learn how to edit in much more detail to make a quality video. After learning the new interface of FCP and its many keyboard shortcuts, students will explore the software and learn how to easily and effectively develop multimedia presentations. In addition, students will review numerous films, genres, and techniques all while immersing themselves within the school and community to create videos that are inspired and original. Students should expect to stay after to complete some of their long-term, independent assignments. Students are required to fill out an application and one teacher recommendation for this course and admittance is subject to approval by Ms. Whelan.
     
     
    Broadcasting IV is a course in which students who have mastered Broadcasting I-III will challenge all of their production skills and techniques they have learned by building a professional portfolio. In the video production industry, potential employers (and many competitive schools) will often request a representation of a candidates' abilities and range in all levels of production before interviewing. In order to prepare for this, students in this class will work on independent projects that will reflect their unique abilities in planning, editing, and filming. They will attempt several different genres and new methods of capturing the necessary mood and/or tone for a piece. Students should expect to stay after to complete some of their long-term, independent assignments. Students will be required to fill out an application in order to be considered for the course.

Speech and Debate

  • Speech and Debate -In this course, students will learn the basic skills of creating speeches and debating from preparation to performance. We will pay close attention to self-awareness, reflective practices, purpose of speech, research and its effective integration, organization of evidence and materials, creation and presentation of speech making materials and aids, as well as appropriate delivery style. Students will develop listening and evaluating skills through both oral and written feedback. Students will also engage in the frequent use of technology.
Last Modified on August 4, 2016