Senior English and Honors Senior English

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    On this page you'll find a brief overview of all my classes, both English and Yearbook; however, to view actual assignments you'll need to log into Canvas -- this is done from the school's homepage (look for an icon on the right side of the page that looks a bit like an orange sunburst).  Every afternoon I post an announcement in Canvas telling what we did in class that day; parents can obtain a Canvas log-in through the guidance office.   

    The county's parent curriculum guide can be viewed with this link:
    https://www.cabarrus.k12.nc.us/Page/18646

    The state's Standard Course of Study for English classes and other classes may be viewed with this link:
    http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/curriculum/languagearts/scos/

Senior English Overview

  • Senior English:
    The county tells us:  English 4 consists of the study of British and Western Literature as well as a review of needed grammar, vocabulary, and the writing of a research literary paper.  A thematic approach to the study of the literature is combined with the traditional chronological approach in an attempt to present the student with historical and cultural background for the various periods in literary achievement. 

    More specifically, in this class we will complete four major units of study, each intended to improve student reading, writing, grammar and vocabulary.  These units are outlined on the semester syllabus, which may be viewed and printed using the link at the end of this column. 

     
    Materials:
    Students need a composition notebook (not a spiral-bound notebook) and writing utensils; all books will be provided.  The Canvas computer program will be used almost every day, and students who prefer to work with a mouse might like to bring one of their own.  Also, a flashdrive is useful but not required. 
     
    Exam:
    English 4 concludes with a North Carolina common final exam.  Students cannot exempt the exam.
     
    Class syllabus:

Honors Senior English Overview

  • Honors Senior English:

    English IV Honors is an in-depth study of British and Western literature as well as composition, a review of needed grammar, vocabulary, and the completion of a research paper.  A thematic approach to the study of literature is combined with the traditional chronological approach in an attempt to present the student with historical and cultural background for the various periods in literary achievment.

    Course Content 

    In Honors English IV, we will study world literature grouped into four major themes that focus on an aspect of the individual's impact on society.  As we analyze this literature, we will use and develop skills in making inferences to better understand the literature, apply the themes to other contexts, and create our own pieces of literature.  In the Honors English IV course, students will experience added rigor from the more intense preparation for critical reading, thinking, and wriwting at the college and university level.

    Standards and Objectives

    To prepare students for the rigors of academic work at the college and university level, this course will especially emphasize

    - independent management of projects

    - locating and vetting quality research sources

    - writing concisely in an academic setting

    Curriculum Plan

    Cabarrus County Schools uses North Carolina's English IV curriculum to devise the four basic units of study as well as focuses on skills for each unit.  If you would like to review the maps, click here.  While English IV classes at all levels follow this same set of units, the Honors level course requires students to move at a faster pace and to manage projects more independently and with less scaffolding.  To see more about the pacing of this particular course at Robinson, click here here.

    Past curriculm documents are also available on the Cabarrus County Schools website.  Click here for more information.

    Instructional Materials

    Added rigor for the Honors level will come from several sources, including the treatmet of novels and plays, which include Beowulf, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare's Macbeth and Dame Mary Stewart's The Crystal Cave as well as various other selections from classic and modern literatuare.  To prepare students for work at the college and university level, students in honors classes are expected to read and analyze texts independently and discuss their respective analyses in class.  Additionally, students will each conduct an independent research based project on an issue related to a major them in a work of literature.  

    Assessment

    This course will utilize multiple means of assessment including projects, writing, quizzes and tests and various informal methods.

    Keep in mind that Honors English is not just "more of the same"; rather, it is intended to better prepare a student fo rthe rigors of college and university work in the future.  Students in honors classes will complete much of the same work as students in other classes; however, t hey are expected to move through these units at a faster pace and are expected to show a higher level of self-motivation, the ability to read and comprehend independently, and a desire and love of learning.  

    Materials:

    Honors students will need a composition notebook (not a spiral-bound notebook) and writing utensils; all books, including the two novels that will be covered in class, will be provided.  The Canvas computer program will be used almost every day, and students who prefer to work with a mouse might like to bring one of their own.  Also, a flashdrive is useful but not required.

    Final Exam:

    English 4 concludes with a North Carolina common final exam.  Students cannot exempt the exam.

    Class syllabus:

Yearbook class

  • Yearbook is an English elective taught third period in fall semester; fall semester students manage school pictures and complete the majority of the yearbook.  In spring semester 4-5 experienced yearbook students stay on as Independent Study students; they complete spring sports, plan the next year's book and distribute the yearbook in May.
     
    Yearbook may be taken multiple times over the course of the high school years.  The class is a great way to become involved in a wide variety of school activities; and for students who excel in the class, it is a very good opportunity for leadership opportunities.

    Admission to the class is competitive and requires an application.  Applications can be picked up from the box outside Room 309 as soon as registration begins in January.
     
    A strong first-time yearbook candidate must have
     
    - solid writing ability, including good punctuation, spelling and editing skills.
    - ability to take constructive criticism and to work on a page until it is "just right".
    - a transcript of high grades in English class.
    - a track record of turning assignments in on time.
    - teacher recommendations that attest to responsible, dependable behavior and attention to detail.
    - an interest in building skills in photographic journalism and manipulation of digital images.
    - a good work ethic, a willingness to put in hours after school, and the ability to work as a team member.
    - school spirit and a positive attitude.
     
    Returning yearbook students must have proven their worth as a member of the staff; specifically, they must have completed all assignments well /on time and must have been a positive member of the yearbook team. 
Last Modified on June 6, 2020